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Posts Tagged ‘long exposure’

Gracelands6
The following was written for Emma Mahony’s excellent module, Art Institutions And Their Publics, which was delivered as part of the NCAD MA Art In The Contemporary World course in 2013. It deals with the notion of the deviant art institution, a concept introduced by Emma on the course, and considers whether Michel Foucault’s idea of the heterotopia might or might not function as an appropriate conceptual model for such an institution.

Michel Foucault’s 1967 lecture Of Other Spaces outlines his concept of the heterotopia1, a sort of countersite which somehow contests or inverts the sets of relations by which spaces and sites in the rest of our world are constituted. Foucault claims that such sites are critical to functioning of the human imaginary and implies that without them a collapse into authoritarianism is inevitable. As he puts it at the end of the piece, after providing the example of the ship as a heterotopia par excellence, “without boats, dreams dry up, espionage takes the place of adventure, and the police take the place of pirates”. (more…)

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Swans at SupersonicThere is a song on the new Swans album, To Be Kind, that is directly inspired by Lars Von Trier’s brilliant 2011 film Melancholia. The film tells the story of two sisters, Claire and Justine, and their differing reactions to the impending arrival of a rogue planet, which, as becomes apparent as the film progresses, is in danger of crashing into and destroying the Earth. The first half of the film revolves around a wedding party at a country house for Justine, who is to be married the next day, an event that Claire is largely responsible for organising. Claire is at home within this world of social and familial ritual, however Justine is not, and her behaviour becomes more and more erratic and unhinged as the evening progresses. The night ends in disarray, with Justine’s husband-to-be and the rest of the guests leaving in disgust, and the wedding cancelled. The second part of the film concentrates on Claire and Justine (along with Claire’s husband and son) as they await the arrival of the planet Melancholia. It initially seems that it won’t collide with Earth at all, however it eventually becomes undeniable that it will, and that there is no escape (Claire’s husband commits suicide when he finally accepts this). Claire goes through stages of denial, fear, panic and despair, whereas Justine calmly accepts the situation, and smilingly tries to comfort Claire right up until the final moments. (more…)

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NiamhO

This is a photography of an installation by the artist Niamh O’Doherty which was exhibited at Broadstone Studios during January of this year. It consists of seven Super 8 projectors and seven hanging screens. Each projector is projecting speeded-up footage shot on a beach in Donegal over the course of one day in October last year. As Niamh puts it, “the film documents the shifts and changes in light and tide through the course of a day”. It was a really well executed piece of work and I wanted to photograph it because there seemed to be a lot of things going on here that resonated with what I have been doing with this project – analogue processes, representations of time. Even the title, The Long Still, seemed like it could just as easily be referring to an extended time exposure photograph. (more…)

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DinahBrandFinished1

I’ve been spending some time recently grappling with Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s philosophical magnum opus, A Thousand Plateaus. This is partly because of a seminar group at NCAD I am involved with, and partly because, well, there’s not really that much of interest on the telly these dark winter evenings. A Thousand Plateaus (let’s call it ATP for short) was published in 1980 and is the second part of a two-volume project by Deleuze and Guattari (let’s call them D&G for short) which they titled Capitalism and Schizophrenia (the first part, Anti-Oedipus, came out in 1972). (more…)

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bunk8_fl_new_ps

One person throwing sheets off bed. 5:04. Emily around bed too. No sheets. Acrobatics from Karen. Trapeze. 6:51. Running around bed, torches. Standing with torches at front. Leech light thing on bed. 4:57. Emily on rope. Bed dark. Nothing will come out here. 4:43. Starts with Emily and other one at bottom of rope. Light descending from top of bed. Sheets being lifted up. Sheet pyramid. Light inside. 6:15. Pyramid coming down. Skinnier than before. Pyramid down at 2:15. All three there now. Quite dark. 5:20. Bed clear. Similar to last one. Very bright at back now. Two of them lying on the bed. 5:28. Sitting on bed. Brighter. Putting harness thing on. Weird costumes. Dressing each other. 5:32. Insect costumes. Standing at front. Someone else involved now. Putting blonde one into harness. 4:33. Still tying her up. Suspended now. Laying out white sheet. Light on back wall. Bed made. 4:34.

BUNK by PaperDolls is running as part of the Dublin Fringe Festival at the Project Arts Centre until Saturday 14th of September. More details here.

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Low

This is Low playing in Whelans a few weeks ago. I’ve always liked Low – one of those rare bands who have a unique sound and are utterly in control of what they’re doing. I liked them even more when I heard they did a 30 minute drone version of one of their songs at a festival in the US earlier this year. The gig in Whelans was a more conventional affair but still great. My Bloody Valentine should take a leaf out of their book and just do one solid hour of the noise section in You Made Me Realise at Electric Picnic on Friday night.

As usual this photograph was created with a single exposure: shutter opened at the start of the song and closed at the end. This was the second song of their set and is an exposure of 3 minutes and 19 seconds in length. I was pretty sure that the photograph would not work out because of the film footage being projected on to the back of the stage (that usually messes things up) but it did. First gig photograph done with my lovely spanking new Toyo 4×5 camera and scanned on my equally lovely new Epson V700 scanner.

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This picture is from The Corn Exchange‘s production of Dubliners, which was running recently as part of the Dublin Theatre Festival. It’s an adaptation of Joyce’s short story collection of the same name and consists of dramatisations of 9 of the 15 stories contained in the book. The photograph is a 16 minute and 50 second exposure of the first scene of the play, which is the story The Sisters, also the opening story in Joyce’s book. (more…)

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AnimalCollective
Someone left the following comment on this blog a little while ago:

this site is not really helpful it could use a little more facts this is to who ever posted this to google

I thought I would try and address this situation a little bit by trying to come up with some facts about this photograph:

  1. It is a photograph of the band Animal Collective
  2. It was taken in Vicar Street a few weeks back
  3. The band were touring their new album which is called Centipede Hz
  4. They had huge inflatable stage props with lights inside them
  5. It is an exposure of approximately 4 minutes
  6. The aperture setting was f32
  7. It was taken using a Cambo camera with a 90mm Schneider lens
  8. It was shot on Ilford FP4 4×5 film
  9. The film was processed by Artur Sikora of the Darkroom Service
  10. The negative was scanned on an Epson V700 scanner
  11. The resultant digital image file is 1200 by 960 pixels wide giving a total of 1,152,000 pixels altogether

Happy Christmas.

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Graham Harman is an interesting character. He’s a leading figure in contemporary philosophy and holds a professorship at the American University in Cairo, yet earlier in life had a stint working as a sports writer in Chicago. It seems an unlikely trajectory, but for Harman it makes perfect sense, as his work insists on grappling with the real stuff of the world rather than retreating entirely into the mysteries of abstract thought. This might sound slightly dull but in fact it is anything but. Harman manages to mystify this real stuff, so much so that after spending some time reading him, I can’t look at my toaster in quite the same way anymore. Based on my somewhat cursory exposure to his work, I’m going to try and quickly sketch out some of his basic ideas. I can’t possibly do them justice but I’m going to try anyway because I think they lead to an interesting new way of thinking about these photographs I am doing. Apologies in advance to any students of philosophy reading this. It might be best if you stop here. (more…)

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Sometime back in the early 90’s I was part of an email music discussion group called chugchanga. This was before way before blogs were around and also a good bit before discussion boards took off. Lots of well-informed and well-connected types used this list (for example Steve Albini would often pitch in) and it was a great way of finding out about new music that wasn’t necessarily being covered anywhere else. There was an Irish guy, who lived in Holland at the time (I’ve forgotten his name), who regularly contributed lengthy analyses of obscure and fascinating-sounding bands he had unearthed. One of these was Fushitsusha: a Japanese psych-rock trio who were led by an enigmatic character called Keiji Haino. They sounded like an incredible proposition. Not really a rock band in any conventional sense, they mixed together free improvisation with scorchingly heavy guitar noise to create something else, something that was, allegedly at least, beyond rock music. (more…)

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